Latest Shared Lives news

Cathy Newman of Channel 4 News met a Shared Lives household: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wb_DyYvE9zE

Our £1.75m partnership with NHS England has been launched with funding awarded to five areas and their Clinical Commissioning Groups to develop Shared Lives as a form of healthcare.

The Shared Lives Incubator social investment programme developed in partnership with Social Finance and Community Catalysts is investing in Shared Lives in three areas.

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Become Shared Lives Plus’s new Finance Director

At Shared Lives Plus, we are looking for a Finance Director to work 22.5 hours per week, based in our Liverpool office. Closing date: 6th November; interviews 21st November.

We are looking for a fully qualified accountant with substantial board level experience and understanding of the charity sector and its funding and market challenges.

To apply see https://jobs.thirdsector.co.uk/job/410274/finance-director/

Ken the artist: Part 2

I shared Ken’s story courtesy of the Medway Shared Lives scheme a few days ago. I see that Ken and household have also been visited by government Minister, Tracey Crouch MP, who wrote on her Facebook page on 8 September:

I met two incredibly inspiring local ladies today – Sarah and Vicky. What is so special about them is they are carers with Medway Shared Lives, a brilliant initiative that is operated by local authorities across the country which provides longterm, short term or emergency homes for vulnerable adults.

Sarah invited me to their home to tell me about Shared Lives and what they do, the value they bring (both in terms of to the individual emotionally but also to local authorities financially) and of course the challenges they face. It was comforting to hear that Medway Council – Service updates and information has recently demonstrated their commitment to the scheme with a welcome increase in carer rates after several years of none. I met Stella (53) and Ken (70) who both have a learning disability and who Sarah and Vicky have hosted now for several years. It is as if they are part of the family and you could tell instantly that both Stella and Ken are settled and very happy.

I think the scheme is a brilliant idea and I wanted to take this opportunity to promote it more widely. If you think you could host an adult who needs just that little bit extra support so they can live independently rather than go into a residential care home, then please do click on one of these links:

http://www.medway.gov.uk/…/car…/becomeasharedlivescarer.aspx

http://www.kent.gov.uk/jobs/become-a-shared-lives-host

https://sharedlivesplus.org.uk/

Caroline’s story

This story was told to us by Sara Podmore who manages the Telford and Wrekin Shared Lives scheme:

Caroline, 26, had been in the Navy. She was being severely bullied whilst training to be a medic. She was initially thrown out of the Navy but after support from charity, Combat Stress, the Navy now supports her in getting help and treatment with severe depression, OCD and post-traumatic stress.

Initially Caroline had been allocated to a support worker in a supported living set up. She had some hours support each week but this was predominantly to help with paperwork. “I wasn’t well, I was basically put into the house and left. I ended up taking a massive overdose and then ended up being sectioned.

I had never heard of Shared Lives and my social work ended up introducing me to Linda and Owen, I don’t remember much from this time but I remember coming round for tea visits before moving in. This was April 2013.”

The Shared Lives team felt that Linda has the listening skills that would be needed to support Caroline through this period of her life. Shared Lives worker, Cath, vividly remembers those first visits. “Caroline looked so small, curled up on the sofa crying looking ill. She was in what looked like a trance. She really didn’t care.”

Caroline describes her OCD: “I stroke the light switches, I check the doors all the time. It’s better to laugh about it if I can. Linda tells me to leave it and she will check it, this really helps, otherwise I would sit by the door all night.”

Caroline says of her first few weeks living with Linda, “The family were so welcoming; it was amazing to be part of the family. I settled in really quickly. I didn’t feel like I was treading on eggshells, there was no pressure. I felt I could approach the carer and they would be non- judgemental.

“In that time I feel my confidence has changed. I’ve got a strength I’ve never had, I’ve had lots of encouragement, I’ve talked for hours with the carers, there is no such word as ‘can’t’.  I do a lot of laughing. I’ve slowly come off some of my medication too in the time I’ve been here which is great. I haven’t had any help from the mental team- Linda has been my mental health team, they have abandoned me. I’ve even managed to have contact again with my family. I see my mum again now who I couldn’t before as she couldn’t deal with me being ill. We do family holidays now too which is amazing.

“Now I work 26 hours a month and have completed my NVQ 2. I run now too. We all eat dinner together. Its important as I can chat, considering it’s their house its amazing they are always there for me. Things like Christmas are amazing we get so many gifts, I never expect it.

“At the very start of my journey I didn’t want to be in the world- but since coming into this placement it’s been great. I’ve not had a dip since I’ve been here and I’ve learnt to listen to my body.

I would tell other people when talking about Shared Lives: there is hope no matter how unhopeful you feel.”

Ken the artist

This is a guest blog in which my colleague Hannah tells Ken’s story, from the Medway Shared Lives scheme in Kent:

“We’re not staff, we don’t clock off after 8 hours, there’s no handover at 10pm, no rigid routines, and we can make sure people have an ordinary day, week, month and year.”

Ken who uses Shared Lives services joined Shared Lives carer, Sarah King in an emergency, unplanned placement in 2011. Sarah soon discovered there was more to Ken than meets the eye.

Ken has a moderate learning disability and needs support for all daily activities. However, this does not stop Ken from being popular in the community, and communicating with a variety of people, despite having a limited vocabulary.

Within a few weeks of Ken living with Sarah, she learnt that he was an artist by a chance meeting with Ken’s former tutor, who ran an art project Ken was involved with, and also a pottery class he attended regularly.

When Ken transferred to Shared Lives he didn’t tell Sarah about his art work. The college he attended thought he may have passed away, due to his unexplained long-term absence, so the reunion was very emotional for both Ken and his tutor.  Delighted to see Ken, the tutor said to Sarah, ‘You do know he’s an artist, don’t you?’

Shared Lives carer, Sarah King said: “We didn’t know… the only art material he brought with him was a child’s colouring book and some worn out felt tip pens. We set about trying to engage him in creative activities, at home and in the community. Several months later the care manager received an email about a new art project, which was to start the following week. Due to us being able to be flexible and responsive to needs and circumstances, I was able to make contact with the facilitators of the art project.  We looked at the workspace- so he joined for 1 day a week the following week.”

The 3 month art project gave Ken some really valuable art experience – he was valued as an artist by professionals in his own right. The art project held an exhibition at the end and Ken sold some great pieces of work at the final exhibition.

Continue reading

Mystery and Bureaucracy

A twitter exchange between Rob Mitchell and Prof Chris Hatton put me in mind of the famous quote from L’Arche founder, Vanier: “Some people say that communities start in mystery and end in bureaucracy”.

Chris, a skilled combiner of academic rigour and humanity, said, ‘Bureaucracy is a vampire. It feeds on people’. Lots of people reading this blog will relate to that, perhaps because they will have felt their own lives drained by working within, or even living within, a public service bureaucracy. What is bureaucracy though?

We all come across bureaucracies. They feel inhuman: some are machine-like; some fanged as Chris says; some have tentacles which we feel reaching around us into our lives.

But a bureaucracy is always a group of people, choosing to behave in a certain way. People will dispute that word “choosing”. The nature of bureaucracies is that, whilst someone at some point wrote their rules, and other people added to them, they feel like they have come to life, operating beyond the control even of those who profess to lead to them.

But whilst Vanier’s quote is often read to mean that every community – a group of people who share some beliefs and ways of behaving – already has some bureaucracy in it, it also suggests that every bureaucracy is also a community.  He could equally have said that every community starts in mystery, and ends in mystery: the mystery of how a group of humans created something which feels so utterly unlike themselves.  The bigger the bureaucracy, the deeper its mystery: the gap between the values of the people within it and the way we feel instructed to behave. This is why I think the challenge facing public service leaders is no longer how to scale up (the business growth model of marketised public services) but how to scale down.

But even in a vast bureaucratic community, no rule is unchangeable, or incapable of more than one interpretation. The choice to be human can feel difficult, or downright dangerous, when we work within a bureaucracy, but nevertheless we make choices. Ultimately, then, the nature of a bureaucracy, lies in the choices the people within it make every day.

The need for a Slow Policy movement

(I was not aware when writing this blog of this 2005 paper by Peter Bate which has a similar theme and which draws on In Praise of Slow by Carl Honore, also new to me. Some ideas percolate, well, slowly.)

There is a slow food movement, which began in Italy, based on the belief that fast food lacks real nourishment and flavour and that its intensive production methods and short cuts are unsustainable for the environment within which it is grown and produced. Slow food is produced with time, care and the understanding of local culture, farming and ecology which can only be developed over years, or even generations. It tends to value small-scale production for its sustainability and for being rooted in community and place.

At present, government and the NHS express the importance of a policy change through the urgency of the deadlines they set themselves and their partners and the amount of money they can ‘find’ in an emergency to fund the change. NHS Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs), in which every area was required to set out how its health system would transform itself to survive the current resource crisis and become sustainable, were clearly important, and therefore urgent. So, most were drafted by small groups of very senior people, who regretted they had not the time nor resources to engage widely, particularly with charities, grassroots groups and people with lived experience who are the most complex and time-consuming to find and talk to. It is no surprise that STPs, despite many containing necessary and pragmatic ideas, have been widely reported by the media as ‘secret NHS cuts plans’.

This cycle of crisis, frenzied activity and shallow changes is endlessly repeated. The urgency turns out to be illusory every time: whilst a report will be rushed out in months, underlying causes of problems will remain unaddressed for years. STPs are morphing into the next set of initials whilst the NHS and social care continue to go bust.

We need a slow policy movement in our public services: a new norm for how to create change. No more flurries of reports and plans from the same group of highly paid people, who remain embedded in group-think. No more heroic leaders on a mission to fix things.

Instead, the slow policy approach would be to cultivate different people and networks which are more deeply-rooted in the lives and service cultures of those affected: people with lived experience, their families and front line workers, who all need training, preparation and a slower pace in order to contribute meaningfully. A change programme would examine the problem or challenge from the point of view of people use services, families, front line workers and people who do not or cannot currently access the service. The conversations with them will start with “What does a good life look like?” not “How can we improve, cut or close replace our service?” The questions will include, “What are you willing to contribute to achieving the goal we all agree is important?” (which is a different question to “Will you pay for our service?”, or “Will you volunteer for us?”)

In place of short term pilots generating tentative findings, new models should be implemented on a small scale but with a plan to scale them up incrementally if they appear to be working, until they replace the current system. As my colleagues in Local Area Coordination say, ‘move slowly, to move fast’. With people who use services genuinely involved in their design and delivery, we would finally have the confidence to remove resources from models which do not work, rather than continuing to resource the status quo, regardless of how much more effective new models proved.

High Performance Failure

Every public service organisation has the potential to forget its purpose – working for the people who use its services – and instead being run for the benefit of those who work for or lead it. This happens in poor services through incompetence or laziness, but it also happens in high performing services, which get seduced by their own reflection.

The recent scandal of St Olave’s school, found to be unlawfully expelling sixth formers whose first year results looked like they might bring down the school’s A level results and threaten its league table position, is an example of this phenomenon. This was a state school, spending public money, which was lauded as one of the best, but which was in fact becoming in some ways one of the worst: wilfully failing and damaging young people at a crucial time in their education. This now appears to have been the practice of a number of ‘top-performing’ schools, who presumably shared the view that their league table success, and accolades for their leaders, outweighed the importance of harming those pupils seen as inconvenient. Arguably, this ‘wheat from chaff’ view of children is just a reflection of a wider crisis of values within the education system, with its lingering fondness for selective schools.

The school system has some features of which make this ‘high-performance failure’ more likely. The head teacher and the education system places huge value on the ‘heroic leader’, with ‘super heads’ wielding unchecked power. 2016 Harvard Business Review research looking at hundreds of heads showed that the most lauded head teachers, who made dramatic short term gains in academic performance, often through excluding more pupils, left no lasting legacy of success, but probably a trail of destruction as they removed ‘problem’ pupils and staff who disagreed).

Governing boards can lack real power, with parental voice limited or non-existent. Despite talk of empowering pupils, the focus of most school policies is on their compliance to rules set by others. An extreme example of this was circulating the internet today: the behaviour policy of an academy school, which, whilst clearly starting with the laudable aim to raise young people’s level of ambition (speaking clearly and confidently in full sentences, for instance) had strayed into an Orwellian nightmare: shy pupils could expect to be punished for speaking too quietly (city hypothetical future job interviews, this would make them appear ‘not that bright’) or even failing to smile enough, which was ‘ungrateful’ and ‘negative’. Despite glib slogans about how successful this would make children (“We’re Charter. We’re smarter”), it’s hard to see what leadership or creativity skills could be learned from being subject to such a monoculture.

This is partly a product of the gap between simplistic notions of success and quality in the education system, and what makes a diverse group of children not just as academically successful as they can be, but also as happy, kind and resilient – which are outcomes either unmeasured or which take second place to results. We also see this gap in adults’ services which are ‘high-quality’ but fail to help people achieve wellbeing or build resilience. Continue reading